...a companion blog to "Math-Frolic," specifically for interviews, book reviews, weekly-linkfests, and longer posts or commentary than usually found at the Math-Frolic site.

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"Mathematics, rightly viewed, possesses not only truth, but supreme beauty – a beauty cold and austere, like that of sculpture, without appeal to any part of our weaker nature, without the gorgeous trappings of painting or music, yet sublimely pure, and capable of a stern perfection such as only the greatest art can show." ---Bertrand Russell (1907) Rob Gluck

"I have come to believe, though very reluctantly, that it [mathematics] consists of tautologies. I fear that, to a mind of sufficient intellectual power, the whole of mathematics would appear trivial, as trivial as the statement that a four-legged animal is an animal." ---Bertrand Russell (1957)

******************************************************************** Rob Gluck

Friday, June 16, 2017

Potpourri of the Week


During week #20 of Donald Trump’s Emperorship:

1)  A new math/statistics blog from a graduate stats couple:

2)  What are complex numbers… I mean, really? (h/t to Jim Propp for this one):

3)  “The illegitimate open-mindedness of arithmetic”… (h/t to Joselle Keyhoe):

4)  Coordinate planes as only Ben Orlin would fancy them:

5)  Another commentary on math giftedness (h/t Cathy O’Neil):

6)  Another post on p-values and fake science results (h/t Stephen John Senn):

7)  Correlation vs. causation in “genome-wide association studies” (h/t Daniel Engber):

9)  I blurbed about a new book anyone into cryptograms will want to have:
…and on Wed. I passed along some puzzles:

Potpourri BONUS! (extra NON-mathematical links of interest): 

1) The fascinating case of a former polygraph operator last week on This American Life:
This story actually comes from another great Web podcast series: Love + Radio 

2)  Last week’s TED Radio Hour included a replay of a favorite old segment with Mike Lowe explaining people’s success with “dirty jobs”:

And as long as I’m pushing podcasts, may as well remind folks that NPR’s wonderful “Invisibilia” is back for its third season:




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